Oculus Rift

One of the major factors inhibiting people from taking a dive into the world of VR is price. Virtual reality headsets are extremely expensive, and a lot of people aren't ready to invest that kind of money into what's been portrayed as little more than a gimmick. Well, Oculus is attempting to make the lure a lot more attractive by cutting the price on the Rift.

Polygon is reporting that the Oculus Rift is now $598 if you get it in the bundle with the Oculus Touch controllers, which is $200 cheaper than if you bought both separately. It's still $100 more than the PlayStation VR bundle, which comes with a game (or two), two PlayStation Move controllers, the PlayStation VR processing unit and the PlayStation Camera. You get all of that for $500 (or $550 depending on the outlet). The vanilla PlayStation VR is available for only $399, which makes it extremely enticing for a lot of people who want to try VR but aren't willing to put $600, $700 or $800 into the high-end headsets like the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive.

This is why Oculus has decided to gun for a competitive price, knocking down the vanilla Rift unit to $499.99 and the Touch units can be purchased for $99.99. That's actually not that bad. In reality the standard headset Rift is now the same as the PlaytStation VR bundle. You still get more with the PSVR in the initial bundle, but you certainly have far more app variety with the Oculus Rift in the long run... well, for the foreseeable future.

One of the major hurdles that Oculus could be facing in the near future involves a lawsuit by ZeniMax, the parent company of Bethesda Software. The company managed to win a $500 million suit against Oculus for using copyrighted code in the VR headset. ZeniMax also filed an injunction that could possibly result in having software using their copyrighted code from being sold for the Rift, or simply have the Rift pulled from store shelves.

Some people have commented that this is Oculus' way of getting all their stock up and out of the door that may contain the copyrighted code, as way to circumvent the injunction. If newer units already have the code removed from the drivers, firmware or related software, then they could avoid having the ZeniMax lawsuit affect them any further.

According to Jason Rubin, the vice president of content at Oculus, he explained to Polygon that the reason is a lot more simple: price.

Rubin explained that a lot of people who tried the Oculus Rift believe that the headset is cool but the price is too high. So they decided to lower the price to bring in more potential consumers.

Rubin went on to explain that the two major factors that Rift had to overcome was the pricing barrier and the software barrier, but he believed that "we have a content portfolio and ecosystem that is worth buying,". Based on a lot of sales data on Steam Spy for VR games, the numbers seem to disagree with Rubin.

Anyway, now that the Oculus Rift has been made cheaper along with the Oculus Touch, is it something you might be interested in purchasing?

Comments

Related

Headlines

Top Games

Gateway Blend ©copyright 2017