How Clark Gregg Channeled Robert Altman, David Mamet For Trust Me

By Eric Eisenberg 6 months agodiscussion comments
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Clark Gregg Trust Me
Trust Me Started Out As Part Of What Could Have Been An Eight Hour Movie
Trust Me has a tight storyline that can easily be summed up into a one-sentence logline: Howard Holloway, a former child star turned child star agent, finds himself in a deep rut, but finds potential salvation when he accidentally discovers an incredibly talented young actress and convinces her to let him represent her. Obviously itís material suited for a feature length movie of its very own, but its origins actually lie in being part of a much, much bigger piece Ė one about eight times its size.

Discussing the origins and inspirations for Trust Me, Clark Gregg kicked off our interview by revealing that his original idea for his second directorial effort was to create something almost Robert Altman-esque: an ensemble anthology-type film set in Los Angeles "about grown-ups who were acting like children and children who were acting like grown-ups." Described by the director as being epic and weird, the whole thing could have been an eight hour-long movie Ė which Gregg didnít really have any confidence in getting made. Instead, he found himself drawn to one of the stories in particular:

"One of them really stuck out as separate, Gregg told me. "It was this kind of thing that felt like a mash-up of a kind of desperation comedy about the underbelly of Hollywood and a kind of film noir, where instead of a loser detective, itís a loser agent for child actors, and I guess because I knew the world, or at least the language of the world, it was something that could just come out in this weird fevered dream."

Having had plenty of his own experience in the film industry, Gregg had a lot to pull from while developing Trust Me as its own script, even without the experience of being a child star himself ("I donít think itís an expose or representative of necessarily even a majority of what that world is like. It felt like a kind of allegory.") All the same, he did feel a degree of responsibility for properly representing the world he was making a movie aboutÖ
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