Superman Styrofoam Plane Takes To The Skies Over Southern California

By Sean O'Connell 2013-07-05 07:40:09discussion comments
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Man, Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel outtakes looks chintzy.

Actually, this creation belongs to Southern California inventor Otto Dieffenbach, who regularly creates radio-controlled Styrofoam aircrafts designed like pop-culture icons. His latest, captured by Sky News, plays off the popularity of Snyder’s blockbuster to show Kal-El soaring over the planet he has chosen to protect. Is there a Styrofoam Zod nearby? Could they possibly find a Styrofoam Metropolis to destroy with the Styrofoam battle?
There are banners and there's planes that fly pulling a big banner -- but to actually see a character, a life-size character fly in the stadium or at an event, down the beach, wherever, is just brand new,” Dieffenbach says. “No-one's ever seen that, it just blows everybody's mind."

The hovering crafts can reach speeds of up to 30 miles per hour. In the past, the inventors says that he has created planes that look like Iron Man, and something named Ms. Emerson, a “flying lady who has wings.” Boy, I wonder if Ms. Emerson sleeps in the bed next to a certain creative inventor?

Snyder can’t be bothered with Styrofoam craft. He’s busy figuring out how he and his Superman team can raise the stakes for a Man of Steel sequel, which some still believe can be in theaters by 2014. And then there’s the question of a Justice League movie, which will happen eventually, even though Steel star Henry Cavill has gone on record kto say that he hopes Warner Bros. takes its time and lays a proper foundation. To rush might be to ruin.

While you wait, if you aren’t too busy combing the skies for paper mache Superman dolls, you can peruse these fascinating behind the scenes reels on Man of Steel, which dive into the visual effects used to bring Kal-El to life in 2013. Snyder’s movie certainly connected with a large audience, earning more than $528 million worldwide. The blockbuster’s special effects work went a long way toward establishing that audience. Because without their work, you have Dieffenbach’s craft, and that ain’t exactly eye-popping.




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