Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy Pushed Back To December

By Eric Eisenberg 2011-08-29 14:24:25discussion comments
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There are still plenty of films left to come out this year, but there are few that I am anticipating more than Tomas Alfredson's Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Based on the novel by John le Carré, the movie has a stellar cast that includes the likes of Gary Oldman, Tom Hardy, Mark Strong, Colin Firth, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Ciaran Hinds and each trailer we've seen has been better than the last. We've known for a while now that the UK, with a September 16 release date, would be getting the film a few months before us, but now, sadly, that wait has been made even longer.

Deadline has reported and InContention has confirmed that Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy has been moved from November 18th to December 9th. The move obviously changes the film's direct competition. While the film was originally going to go up against Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 1 and Happy Feet 2, it will now be released against David Gordon Green's The Sitter, Garry Marshall's New Year's Eve, Jason Reitman's Young Adult, Mark Pellington's I Melt With You and Madonna's W.E. Set during the Cold War, the story follows a retired MI6 agent named George Smiley (Oldman) who is called back into duty to sniff out a Soviet spy.

To help make the wait a bit easier, the film has launched a soundtrack website where you can preview the movie's score. The site contains all 19 tracks from composer Alberto Iglesias, but for those expecting to hear the song from the trailer, you might want to click on this link instead.

I hate to say it but despite its amazing promotions I have the feeling that Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is destined to be buried at the box office (New Year's Eve won't be as big as Twlight but Valentine's Day had a $56 million opening in February 2010 and this one has even more stars that the masses can gawk at). With any luck the film is truly good enough to make an authentic Oscar run and make some money via critical praise. If True Grit was able to make nearly $200 million domestically opening against Little Fockers I can pray that anything is possible.
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