Kim Novak Calls The Artist's Use Of Vertigo's Score 'Rape', Michel Hazanavicius Responds

By Eric Eisenberg 2012-01-09 16:07:09discussion comments
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Kim Novak Calls The Artist's Use Of Vertigo's Score 'Rape', Michel Hazanavicius Responds image
Actors might want to start thinking about not using the word "rape" when not referring to anything other than sexual assault. In the past few years alone both Kristen Stewart and Johnny Depp found themselves in hot water when they used the term to describe being photographed and had to later apologize for using the term. Now screen legend Kim Novak has uttered the PR-nightmarish word, but instead of referring to getting her picture taken, she's †talking about†Michel Hazanavicius using the score from Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo†in The Artist.

Deadline has learned that Novak recently watched a screener of Hazanavicius' movie and was†horrified†to discover that the filmmaker made use of†Bernard Herrmann's music from the Hitchcock classic. "I want to report a rape," Novak said in an official statement. "My body of work has been violated by The Artist. This film took the Love Theme music from Vertigo†and used the emotions it engenders as its own." The actress believes that the recent film uses the music to "unconsciously or consciously" bring back feelings felt by audiences watching Hitchcock's film and feels that it's a form of cheating. She does recognize that Herrmann is given credit at the end of the film, but feels that a bigger principle is at play. "It is essential that all artists safeguard our special bodies of work for posterity, with their individual identities intact and protected," Novak said.

Following the comments, THR reached out to Hazanavicius for comment and he responded by saying that The Artist†as a whole is a love letter to old Hollywood, and his way of showing "admiration and respect" for classic films. "I love Bernard Hermann and his music has been used in many different films and Iím very pleased to have it in mine," Hazanavicius said. "I respect Kim Novak greatly and Iím sorry to hear she disagrees."

This actually brings up an interesting debate. Is it unfair for a filmmaker to use emotional and/or iconic music from a previous source for a movie, or is the nostalgia factor a legitimate excuse? What do you think?
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