Designer Wants To Copyright Steve Jobs Tribute Logo

By Brent Randall 3 years ago
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Did you ever think to yourself that the silhouette of Steve Jobs might fit pretty nicely where the “bite” in the Apple logo is? Well you aren’t that special if you did, because at least three other people already thought of it and all designed the logo in fairly similar ways. Now the Internet is buzzing about who should rightfully own the design, and even though the three designers seemed to be handling the situation calmly, one of them has filed a copyright claim.

PC Magazine reports that Jonathan Mak Long (designer of first logo at top), Chris Thornley aka Raid71 (second logo) and Farzin Adeli (third logo) each claim that they designed the logo independently of any of the others. It has been established that Thornley’s logo was created in May 2011 while the other two were created after Jobs died. Adeli, however, is said to have filed a copyright application for his design, despite his being created later.

Thornley and Long seem to be cool with each other, as Long has admitted that Thornley’s came first, and Thornley has accepted the possibility that someone else would come up with the same idea. Thornley and Adeli are currently selling their respective images, with proceeds going toward cancer charities. But for some reason, Adeli thinks that he deserves copyright protection instead of the other two creators, or you know, that place that owns the actual Apple logo in the first place.

That is why this copyright application comes off as crazy. The story started out as an interesting coincidence – three people inspired by Jobs who saw the potential of altering the logo came up with the same basic idea. Sometimes that happens, and its not infringement if people legitimately were not influenced by other people’s expressions, even if their creations are identical in the end. But Apple owns the original logo. Not to mention, Steve Jobs’ estate might have a problem with his likeness being copyrighted by someone else. Apple is a worldwide brand. It is not going to let its intellectual property, especially its incredibly recognizable logo, be compromised. Don’t expect this copyright application to go anywhere.
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