Over the last few months, 14-year-old Julia Bluhm crusaded via Change.org in order to encourage popular teen magazine Seventeen to change the company’s policies on Photoshopping its young models. After amassing over 84,000 signatures, Bluhm eventually prevailed and now Seventeen editor Ann Shokat has spoke out to say the magazine will only Photoshop zits, bra straps, and other unseemly things not involving size in the future. Teens are smarter than you would give them credit for, and have more free time, too and a group of those smart and free teens have realized the Seventeen magazine victory is only one magazine down, a multitude to go.

On Tuesday, a fresh group of teens gathered in Times Square to take a stand against Teen Vogue, a magazine that may be blatant in the use of only super skinny women on its pages. The protest was led by Spark Movement, a group promoting diversity tolerance among young women—especially in the pages of magazines. The protest was led by teens Carina Cruz and Emma Stydahar who say they are not willing to give up until change is accomplished. According to FOX News, however, Teen Vogue says they don’t use Photoshop.

However, the movement among teen girls to see peers on the pages of magazines of all shapes, heights, and sizes hardly begins with Photoshop—it only ends with the program’s touch-ups. A few days ago, Sports Illustrated model Kate Upton was belittled for not managing a weight of like 100 lbs, which not only sends a strange and narrow-minded message to women of all ages, but also makes us all look as if we are invested in a never-ending weight dramedy. The cool part of chasing different ideals as a woman is tolerance. Once we move past the stage we are currently in, impressionable teens will have a much easier time of it. Also, I’m almost certain the fashion industry will make more money.

Pop Blend will keep you posted if Teen Vogue decides to roll in the same direction as Seventeen.

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