Subscribe To Splinter Cell: Conviction Vs. Uncharted 2 - Round 1: Multiplayer Versatility Updates
Welcome to another addition of the Blend Games Weekly Battle. This time around we’re previewing and comparing the upcoming Splinter Cell: Conviction and the remarkably well-crafted Uncharted 2: Among Thieves. Like before, we’re joined by a few staff members from the reputable UK online gaming news outlet, Electronic Theatre.






So here’s how this will work: there will be three rounds, and one round per week. We’ll compare the features of both games and take a look at what makes one more buy worthy over the other. You can further voice your opinion with the poll or comment box provided below. And as if the headline and images weren’t obvious enough this week we’ll be covering multiplayer versatility. All right, let’s get this thing started.


Splinter Cell: Conviction:


BG – Ryan: These games are way too different to compare! Climbing up a ledge and shooting a guy in Splinter Cell is so much more of a unique experience than climbing up a ledge and shooting a guy in Uncharted!

ET - Kev J: Splinter Cell Conviction is about to change the way you look at multi-player spy games, and that’s even with the PlayStation 3 exclusive The Agency on the calendar. Featuring a co-operative mode entirely removed from the single-player campaign as well as versus bouts, in areas populated by civilians, Splinter Cell: Conviction builds on everything you’ve experienced in previous games with the added grunt of the Current-Generation’s horsepower.

BG – William: Aside from agreeing with Ryan, I think Splinter Cell may differentiate itself more-so with multiplayer from Uncharted 2 than with the single-player. Mainly because the inclusion of civilians and the option to utilize the environment against foes adds a whole new depth and layer to the basic co-op modes and deathmatch. Side-by-side I’d have to tip my hat in favor of Conviction only for the fact that standard run-and-gun is an option, but the inclusion of multiplayer stealth amongst a throng of people in the streets is kind of original and cool.


Uncharted 2: Among Thieves


BG – Ryan: What a ridiculous comparison! How can you compare a third person shooter with climbing mechanics to a third person shooter with climbing mechanics and an outdoors setting?!"

BG - William: Even though you climb around on things and shoot people in both games the action is a little more frantic in Uncharted 2. This faster pace is probably the bigger cooperative difference between Splinter Cell: Conviction, despite the fact that the gameplay and character operation in Conviction is far more acade-y than previous Splinter Cell games. Even though both games have cover mechanics and melee attacks, I think Uncharted 2 seems more multiplayer friendly given its fluid control scheme and butter-smooth animations. However, I think it may lack some of the depth for playing-style options and environment manipulation featured in Conviction.

ET – Dan: Co-operative play, team-based multi-player and Deathmatch modes are promised for Uncharted 2: Among Thieves, with much more besides. Gunplay works well enough in the original Uncharted: Drake's Fortune, and in the beta test we’ve already seen it works even better here. Players need to take advantage of cover, hiding behind brick walls, firing blindly when it's needed. Platforming action is even involved, giving you an advantage just when you need it most, but exposing the player whilst on the way up. Uncharted 2: Among Thieves plays like a cross between Gears of War’s gunplay and Prince of Persia’s Platform action in multi-player, and offers one of the most diverse set of tactics imaginable because of it.

Voting Time!
You’ve read over the details and you can check out both games in action below. It’s time to place your vote for which game you look forward to most when it comes to multiplayer versatility. And be sure to stay tuned in next week for round 2.



Splinter Cell Vs Uncharted 2
RESULTS

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