The holidays were a bit gloomy for gamers thanks to DDoS attacks against both Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network, meaning that console owners new and old were left unable to take their games online for several days in a row. Rockstar Games decided to take a little sting off of the situation, though, extending their festive plans for Grand Theft Auto V to an indeterminate amount of time.

Back before the holidays, Rockstar Games announced that booting up Grand Theft Auto V through the holidays would net players some special rewards, including holiday-themed masks for robberies, hideous sweaters and even the ability to purchase a third property housing up to 30 cars and nine bikes.

Unfortunately, the hacking group Lizard Squad decided to be a bunch of grinches this year, making good on earlier promises to execute DdoS attacks on both the Sony and Microsoft online networks. What did that mean for the average gamer and those who just got new consoles for the holidays? No online services. You couldn't sign in, play online or buy digital content, period. The Xbox Live network got back up and running a couple of days later with the PlayStation Network only finally getting its wheels spinning again as of yesterday.

Several developers who had holiday plans for their games over the weekend have decided to extend or reschedule their festive plans. In Destiny, for instance, the weekend vendor named Xur stuck around a bit longer than normal and all of those holiday goodies promised the week prior have simply been postponed.

If you were hoping to spend the holidays gaming online in GTAV, then you can simply follow through with those plans a bit late, according to a recent tweet from Rockstar Support.

The tweet states simply that, “Due to issues with PSN & XBL connectivity, we're extending the GTA Online Festive Surprise Christmas Day inventory gifts for the time being.”

No word on how long this extension will last, so be sure to fire up your copy of GTAV ASAP is you plan on reaping the rewards.

These kinds of attacks are becoming more common nowadays, with a similar hit back in August on the PlayStation Network and a far more devastating attack on PSN a couple of years ago that put the network down for the count for over a month. I'd at least understand this type of behavior if there was some sort of a cyber heist involved but, instead, it looks like modern hackers are just children with a stick, going after retweets and lifelong subscriptions to online file-sharing services as rewards for their crimes.

Whatever point they were trying to make, it's unlikely a few days of down time is going to knock a big dent in Sony or Microsoft's wallet. Instead, these kinds of attacks hurt the millions of gamers who simply want to, you know, enjoy the devices and games they spent their hard-earned money on.

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