The Game Awards for 2016 are coming up fast and that means that we're likely going to see some world premieres make their debut during the event. The host and executive producer, Geoff Keighley, revealed that they might be doing things differently with the reveals following the No Man's Sky debacle.

Speaking with Polygon, Keighley mentioned that he's partly to blame for the over-hype of No Man's Sky, because Hello Games was showing off footage of a game that didn't quite represent what it was going to be in the final version. Keighley is hoping that the Game Awards coverage will be more representative of what the games actually are and not what they could be, saying...

I have thought about the story of No Man's Sky a lot. Did we create this black hole of hype that the developers couldn't pull themselves out of? Some of that was authored by me.There is a good moral of that story and it's part of what I'm trying to address this year; to have developers be more transparent about the state of their game.

It's not just The Game Awards that is adopting this new kind of standard of honest promotion of upcoming games. It's something that developers have had to modify and change when presenting their content at E3 as well. A lot of companies want to bask in the limelight of the hype-trains, but the reality is that if you're promising a game through fancy cinematics and tech demos but then the actual game is this completely different beast (i.e., Aliens Colonial Marines) then yeah, a lot of people are going to be pissed.

No Man's Sky

Ubisoft was notorious for showcasing some awesome cinematic-style presentations of their games, only for them to go through what people called "downgrades" by the time they hit store shelves. Both Watch Dogs and The Division were products of cinematic over-hype and the under-delivering of those promises.

No Man's Sky was similar to the aforementioned games, even being featured in a really cool way during The Game Awards. However, at the same time, it was the barrage of promotion and the promise of features that just never made their way into the game itself that really disappointed the gaming community. This is one of the things that caused a lot of people to get frustrated and angry because things like multiplayer were said to be in the game, even though it actually wasn't.

Keighley admits it's a struggle for developers trying to weed their way through the right course of action for promoting their game. It's understandable that work-in-progress titles are always going to be at a disadvantage based on how early they are in the design phase of production, but Keighley wants to strike a middle ground to avoid another No Man's Sky fiasco.

The only thing I think Keighley did get wrong in the interview was when says that this is also an issue that movies run into as well. Sure movies can receive trailers that don't fully represent what they're about, but I've yet to see a movie that was downgraded... where they promised Will Smith in the lead role but we ended up with Cuba Gooding Jr.

The Game Awards is scheduled to air on December 1st on a Thursday, next month. We'll be sure to keep an eye out on how newer games are premiered at the event.

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