Leave a Comment

If you've been clamoring for more info on Starbeeze and Overkill Software's upcoming The Walking Dead game, then you've just hit a small jackpot. Some new details have emerged for the upcoming action title from the Payday 2 developers.
Polygon has a brief article about how the game is being approached and what sort of design elements gamers can look forward to. At a SXSW panel featuring Robert Kirkman, the creator of the comic and TV show, briefly talked about the upcoming The Walking Dead title from Starbreeze:
I can say that it will be Payday-esque because [Starbreeze and Overkill] are currently doing Payday. But I'm told it will be in a bigger world than Payday currently encompasses. They are going to be learning a lot of stuff from Payday that they will be incorporating into The Walking Dead game.

There will be announcements about that game very soon.

Details on The Walking Dead from Starbreeze and Overkill Software has been sparse to say the least.

The game was originally announced last summer, but dropped off the face of the planet.

It may be a licensed property, but if it's anything like Payday 2, I'm in. I mean, Payday 2 was easily one of the best games I played in 2013. Taking some elements from that game will do The Walking Dead some good, especially if they mirror the stage or environmental designs. Payday 2 had a lot of environmental usage, when it came to stealth, cover fire, and suppression fire. Players were encouraged to move around and make good on the game's realistically modeled locations to thwart police and mercenary forces.

Kirkman believes that a departure from the typical licensed-property archetype will help The Walking Dead stand out, especially with titles like Telltale's The Walking Dead.

Here's how he put it:
One thing that we are doing, which I think is very cool about the Telltale game and the Starbreeze game and Air game is that they are all licensed games, and licensed games are usually somewhat crappy, but thankfully our's aren't.[...] The key I think, which is very important, is that we're not doing, 'Hey, it's Daryl Dixon running around shooting zombies, because you like Daryl Dixon.' Or 'It's Rick Grimes doing this because you like Rick Grimes.' We're telling our own stories and doing our own things almost as if they are original games.

There was a time, way back in the day, when licensed games were actually the top of the crop. Remember Aladdin? Remember The Jungle Book? Remember The Lion King? Or how about DuckTales? Those freaking awesome Mickey Mouse games like Castle of Illusion and World of Illusion?

Hopefully, as Kirkman states, the freedom of expression afforded to developers to branch outside of the standard canon will allow them to succeed with their endeavors. Activision tried doing exactly what Kirkman mentioned above by cashing in on the Daryl Dixon fame with a lame first-person shooter based on The Walking Dead, but it appears as if they aren't going that route anymore.
The Walking Dead: World Beyond's Co-Creator Gives Blunt Response To Rick Grimes Connections television 3d The Walking Dead: World Beyond's Co-Creator Gives Blunt Response To Rick Grimes Connections Nick Venable
The Walking Dead: World Beyond's Showrunner On Huck's Father, Leo And Belshaw's CRM Relationship After Finale television 3d The Walking Dead: World Beyond's Showrunner On Huck's Father, Leo And Belshaw's CRM Relationship After Finale Nick Venable
8 Major The Walking Dead: World Beyond Questions We Have After The Season 1 Finale television 4d 8 Major The Walking Dead: World Beyond Questions We Have After The Season 1 Finale Nick Venable