Bill Hader made his triumphant return to Saturday Night Live last night, and while he kicked ass per usual, the real winner was actually Dan Cortese. Known to some as Seinfeld’s Mimbo and to others as a former MTV VJ, the ultimate loveable bro was referenced as a part of every single club Stefon mentioned last night on Weekend Update. Not surprisingly, Twitter exploded with happiness and hilarious references because there is nothing people on Twitter love more than a random person they haven’t thought about in a few years.

Cortese, of course, was a great sport and ate up every second he was trending across the world.



As for Hader himself, he was in glorious form playing Stefon again. He couldn’t help but laugh a few times, especially at all of the Cortese references, but he also delivered a few hysterical lines about a doorman who only high fives children of divorce, a club that opened during the two hours between Michael Jackson and Farrah Fawcett’s death and the hotel channel that’s about the hotel itself. The crowd ate up all of it and gave the character and the comedian playing him a couple of huge applause breaks. For all the laughs that partnership has delivered over the years, the breaks were deserved too.

It was actually really nice to see Stefon interact with new Weekend Update hosts too. Referring to Michael Che and Colin Jost as “Barack and Mitt” and openly talking about how much he loves seeing one of each, Hader turned up the awkward dial as far as possible. With the character of Stefon, however, it works perfectly. It can never get too inappropriate, awkward or racially insensitive when he’s on talking about doing things that make you uncomfortable the next time you see your parents.

Hopefully you enjoyed the hell out of this sketch because there’s a possibility we won’t see Stefon again for years or maybe even longer. Then again, here’s to hoping Bill Hader hosts at least once ever few years for decades to come.

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