A knight charges into battle in For Honor

For Honor just can't seem to catch a break. During the Hero Series Grand Final over the weekend, a tournament meant to drum up excitement for the floundering class-based brawler, the event instead turned sour when a well-known exploit was utilized by the winner to claim the top prize. Ubisoft has now come out to say that, yes, they will finally be addressing the issue in an upcoming patch.

Over the weekend, Ubisoft hosted a Hero Series Grand Final for For Honor as part of an ongoing effort to bring more players into the game. The prize pool was $10,000, with the overall champion openly crediting his big win to an in-game exploit known as "Unlock tech." As Polygon is reporting, this method basically creates an attack that the opponent cannot block or parry.

The event champion, Jakub Palen, seems to have used this opportunity to demonstrate to Ubisoft why a certain degree of polish still needs to be poured into For Honor, as well as why developers need to pay closer attention to their community in a game that was designed to be such a competitive affair. Palen actually wrote a detailed explanation of how the Unlock Tech move worked, explaining that when used with a certain in-game class, a player could basically become unstoppable. He offered up this information a month ago, with Ubisoft apparently either not getting the memo or choosing to ignore it. That being the case, Palen had no qualms with using said move to trounce the competition and eventually win the weekend's tournament.

Obviously, the community was a bit on the furious side. Some were mad at Palen for using Unlock tech while others felt he was justified since, again, Ubisoft knew about the exploit and did nothing to address it.

And in case anyone wants to argue that maybe the patch would have taken longer than a month to implement, we'd argue that Ubisoft has now proven otherwise. According to the initial report, a Ubisoft representative announced that the exploit would be addressed in a patch going live today, Aug. 15. So Palen made his grand statement on Saturday and, three days later, it is being taken care of by a simple patch.

The statement goes on to claim that the developers will continue to support the game and make fixes based on player feedback, so hopefully, they'll follow through on those claims now that they've seen how badly these types of exploits can harm a game and its community. Again, we realize this is "just a game," but it's a game that was designed to live and die based on balance and continued support. We're not saying that Ubisoft isn't supporting For Honor, just that maybe they need to work on re-prioritizing their efforts moving forward.

Blended From Around The Web

Related

Headlines

Top Games

Gateway Blend ©copyright 2017