What's the record for the most film directors quitting a prospective project? While there's no concrete answer available, we'd love to know the ballpark figure, as The Crow reboot seems like it's making a case for the title. The remake looks like it's about to lose its fourth director, as well as any chance of being made under the Relativity banner.

The Wrap ran the scoop that director Corin Hardy is looking like he might be leaving the long-suffering remake of the 1994 indie hit, all because of the troubles studio Relativity is going through. As a result of Hardy's possible departure from the project, producer Edward R. Pressman – a producer of the original film version of The Crow - is filing for the rights to revert to his hands a little sooner. Considering the circumstances of Relativity's bankruptcy proceedings, he could very well get his way.

The agreement that grants Relativity the rights to make The Crow stipulate that a certain amount of effort must be put into the film's production and distribution, with the film being required to enter Principal Photography before the time limit of 3 years has lapsed. Pressman feels that the bankruptcy proceedings will impair any sort of production that would fit the criteria laid out, which lead to his filing an objection to the studio trying to bundle The Crow into their bankruptcy sale. With the studio unable to promote and release the films they've already dedicated similar, if not greater, levels of investment toward; The Crow looks like it'd be in better hands with one of the people who originally gave the graphic novel cinematic life.

This couldn't have come at a worse time, as the revolving door of lead actors recently saw Jack Huston leave the project, and Relativity has shelved several films that were supposed to have already been in theaters by now. Adding insult to injury is the fact that the studio is also being sued by an investment company that paid them to promote the films they had completed. With all of these various points of conflict and turmoil putting the studio in a tough spot, the sale of any projects active or dormant on Relativity's docket will need to go smoothly.

Ultimately, there's two ways this dispute will end: either the courts will engage in the usual due process, and award The Crow to one of the two parties, or both parties will settle out of court in a more amicable manner. Relativity would probably be best suited by letting the project transfer back to Edward Pressman's hands, but for all we know, any proceeds from the bankruptcy auction – set to take place next Wednesday – would go directly into putting The Crow into production soon after the new owners turn the lights back on.

It's not looking hopeful, but as soon as any new developments occur on The Crow, we'll report back with the news.

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