There are some great things about today's generation of gaming: Ease of access to online digital distribution, continued support from developers with post-release patches, multiple driver updates configured to help your hardware run the game the way it was meant to be played, etc.

However, there's also a dark side to today's generation of gaming... things that gamers have to deal with that they didn't have to content with back in the day. These are the five major problems in gaming that we didn't have to deal with when we were growing up as kids.

Digital Rights Management
Back in the day it was called “copyright protection”. Gamers would be required to search through the game manual and find a certain word on a certain page in a certain sentence to insert the code and proceed to play the game. These days we have DRM, or digital rights management. It's effectively the same thing insofar that if you don't have a legitimate copy of the game, you won't have an easy time of playing said game. However, there's a major downside: sometimes it doesn't work and honest consumers get shafted.

Recent examples of games not working as intended due to DRM is something like Dark Void, which constantly has an influx of new, angry gamers every time they picked the game up during a digital sale only to find that the third-party DRM vendor no longer distributes working keys without contacting customer support or Capcom first. Basically, without a working key, you have a dud. Other examples of poorly or non-functioning DRM included Games For Windows Live, Diablo III's always-on DRM – where you couldn't even play single-player without logging in – and a recent issue where G2A distributed some Ubisoft games where the keys turned out to be fraudulent and Ubisoft revoked access to those keys through Uplay's remote DRM feature after customers purchased the games, resulting in the games no longer functioning for a time. Definitely stuff you never had to deal with back in the day.

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