Jupiter Ascending is not only the latest offering from The Wachowski's, it's also their first 3D offering to the public. How in the world it took them this long to release a film in the third dimension is beyond me, especially with Speed Racer just begging for the perfect conversion and IMAX re-release to happen any day now. Suffice it to say your mileage may vary on this film, as it's been all across the board with the reviews.

Our theatrical review will weigh in on whether or not this new release is worth your time, while this column will focus solely on the film's use of 3D. Considering seven separate categories, To 3D Or Not To 3D evaluates the full scope of the 3D viewing experience. Think of it as a consumer's guide for your movie-going, complete with a viewer’s poll where you can weigh in on how you plan to see Jupiter Ascending. How should you go see the new film from the Wachowskis? Read on to find out!

Fit Score
5/5
The Wachowski's filmmaking style has always been a bit 3D friendly - what with the over the top visuals, kinetic action, and beautifully colored worlds they inhabit. Jupiter Ascending has everything from debris to spaceships, and even honey bees, just waiting to come off the screen and into your world. Jupiter Ascending is one of those movies that one could say 3D is made for.

Planning & Effort Score
4/5
Chris Parks, the Steroscopic Supervisor behind Gravity's beautiful 3D picture, was the guiding hand behind the 3D conversion to Jupiter Ascending, and boy, does it ever show! Much like Gareth Edwards did on Godzilla, The Wachowski's use the conversion process to their advantage. Since the film is heavy on digital effects and world building to begin with, it's not hard to create these elements with native 3D aspects. However, even the actual physical elements are properly calibrated. That being said, the fact that the third dimension didn’t enter into the conversation until later in the game dents this score a little.

Before the Window Score
4/5
There are definitely moments where something was flying at the screen during Jupiter Ascending, and I found myself flinching upon instinct. Any battle or chase sequence, be it the ones flying through the skies of Chicago or in the atmosphere of Jupiter, takes full advantage of the 3D medium, pushing the boundaries between the screen and the audience.

Beyond the Window Score
5/5
Alternately, this element of 3D makes the film world seem to stretch deep beyond the theater's screen. The amount of depth and focus in Jupiter Ascending's picture is quite impressive, as it's subtle, but definitely appreciated when noticed. Above all, we would highly recommending paying particular attention to the holographic elements of the film's universe, as they're probably the best example of the movie really sucking the audience into its world.

Brightness Score
4/5
3D glasses guarantee the intended picture will be tainted with a tint of grey, thanks. A result of this is that it’s up to the post-production crew to be sure the color correct for releases compensate accordingly. While there's still just a little gray in the film's picture, Jupiter Ascending is an exceedingly colorful affair, with a lot of eye popping palettes on display. It is worth noting that this can be somewhat subjective for audiences, as some theaters are better at showing 3D than others.

Glasses Off Score
5/5
This is an extremely rudimentary test to show in the basest terms how much 3D you're getting on screen. Take the glasses off, and observe the blur, which will reveal the different perspective being manipulated to create the 3D effect. While watching Jupiter Ascending, I occasionally looked over the rims of my glasses and discovered that the picture was consistently blurry throughout the film - be it a simple conversation or a spaceship parting a planet's rings.

Audience Health Score
5/5
Despite the frenetic pacing of the action, Jupiter Ascending isn't a shaky cam-ed nightmare for people who are sensitive to 3D. This is a solid 3D offering that flows well visually, and doesn't move too fast for your eyes to adjust. The focus is always in the right place, and it's not a strain on the eyes either.

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