XFL Logo

The eyes of many football fans were on the XFL its inaugural weekend, as those who had only just watched the Super Bowl last Sunday were already desperate for more. The WWE-owned league has done a lot to differentiate itself from its first run long ago, specifically striving to be closer to pro football than pro wrestling. Even the greatest plans can fall through, though, and one week in the league there could be some fines after a player dropped the rebooted league's first f-bomb on live television.

The moment happened during the very first game of the league, which was a match-up between the Seattle Dragons and DC Defenders. Reporter Dianna Russini was on the sideline hoping to get fresh commentary from players after key plays in the game, and obviously got a little more than she bargained for with Dragons center Dillon Day. Day had just left the field after being penalized for a post-play skirmish, and may have forgotten he was on live.

The XFL broadcast tried to cut the swear but was slow to the draw and ended up cutting the rest of Dillon Day's comment. Day's f-bomb isn't ideal, given there can be hefty fines given out by the FCC if complaints roll in, though it isn't like this is the first time a player has been caught swearing on live television.

With that being said, there is a difference between the NFL and XFL in this regard. The latter has far less restrictions on player and coach availability and the media has access to players and coaches mid-game. This means interviews can be conducted after big plays on the field, which ideally helps heighten fan enthusiasm for the moments. Obviously, emotions are going to run high in these situations, so perhaps the league should have someone with a quicker finger on the censor button in these situations.

Especially if reporters continue to interview players after disappointing plays. Granted, it's not like every player is going to cut loose like a sailor when interviewed after doing something they wish they hadn't. DC Defenders kicker Ty Rausa missed a field goal that would've tied the game, but managed to keep his composure in the interview that took place shortly after.

The XFL has a lot of mics on the field, and is able to listen in on a lot of player and coach commentary. While this was one of the first f-bombs, there's a chance it won't be the last. Will whatever consequences come from these moments make the new league rethink how open its access is, or will it press on and perhaps remind everyone to be on their best behavior throughout the game?

Related

Uncut Gems Is Apparently Top 10 In All-Time Movie F-Bombs

The XFL season is underway, as is the 2020 midseason for most cable and network television. Stick with CinemaBlend to stay on top of all the latest and greatest news happening in television and movies.