Jamie Lee Curtis in Halloween Kills

2020 was a wild one, and the entertainment industry came to a screeching halt when sets and theaters around the world were shut down. One of the many movies which were pushed back a full year was David Gordon Green's Halloween Kills. The slasher sequel was meant to be released this past October, before Blumhouse pulled it in hopes of making a box office haul in 2021. The legendary John Carpenter recently spoke about the movie's quality, and definitely made it sound like it's worth the wait.

John Carpenter changed the film world with his 1978 original Halloween movie, starting a slasher property that has never been far from theaters. He's given his blessing to the current trilogy, even writing the music for David Gordon Green's 2018 installment. Halloween Kills was completed ahead of its original release date, and Carpenter's description of the movie will make fans very happy. As he put it,

It's brilliant. It's the ultimate slasher. I mean, there's nothing more than this one. Wow! Man.

Talk about high praise. It sounds like David Gordon Green and Danny McBride really outdid themselves with Halloween Kills. Everything we've heard from the set has teased a much bigger scope, as well as a massive bodycount. And now if John Carpenter is to be believed, the delayed project is the "ultimate slasher." Is it October yet?

John Carpenter's comments to EW are definitely exciting, although it makes the extra year of waiting for Halloween Kills all the more painful. While not much is known about the movie's contents, the second installment in the current trilogy is seemingly gearing up to be a horror version of The Avengers. Various characters from Carpenter's original movie will return, as Haddonfield arms up to take on The Shape themselves.

Perhaps it's this formation of characters that makes Halloween Kills feel like the ultimate slasher to John Carpenter. Joining Jamie Lee Curtis are original Halloween actors Kyle Richards, Nancy Stephens, and Charles Cyphers who are all reprising their roles forty years later. Additionally we'll meet adult versions of the characters Tommy Doyle and Lonnie Elam, played by Anthony Michael Hall and Robert Longstreet respectively.

While we haven't been treated to a full trailer, some limited footage from Halloween Kills has been released to help satiate the fandom. In it we see the mob violence of Haddonfield, as every character is armed to the teeth now that Michael Myers is back. Check it out below.

2018's Halloween focused largely on Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode, and the trauma she experienced in the decades since surviving her fateful encounter with The Shape. We saw how this affected her family, although her obsession ultimately paid off when Michael managed to escape his transport from Smith's Grove. But he seemingly survived Laurie's basement trap, and will be back for blood in Halloween Kills.

As we get closer to Halloween Kills' release this coming fall, fans are no doubt going to become more vocal about wanting to see a full trailer. And while there are some moviegoers who might be worried about the sequel getting delayed again, Jason Blum has expressed his commitment to putting out the sequel this October no matter what.

Halloween Kills is currently set to arrive in theaters on October 15th. In the meantime, check out our 2021 release list to plan your next movie experience.

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