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Britney Spears Pens Message To Fans After Being Released From Her Conservatorship

screenshot of Britney Spears
(Image credit: Britney Spears' YouTube)

Britney Spears’ conservatorship has been heavily debated for almost a year now. Even though more and more information about it became public knowledge, questions continued to linger as to how and why the pop singer was still in the thick of it after 13 years. Her fans pushed the “Free Britney” movement, in an effort to change the situation, even going so far as to spam the likes of Kim Kardashian and Paris Hilton. Well, the day of true freedom has finally come. Following her official release from the conservatorship, Spears had a direct message to those fans who helped make it possible.

During a court hearing yesterday, the judge ruled that the conservatorship in question was “no longer required” (via NPR). At the time, Britney Spears, with a little help from her fiancé Sam Asghari, gave a shout out to the Free Britney movement by wearing a t-shirt with those words over it and also said it was “a human rights movement.” But she was little more personal about it today. On her Instagram, she wrote in response to the major news:

Good God I love my fans so much it’s crazy!!! I think I’m gonna cry the rest of the day !!!! Best day ever … praise the Lord … can I get an Amen

Several important events have contributed to the conservatorship’s final conclusion. First, in August, the singer was able to replace her court-appointed lawyer with someone she believed would advocate in her interest: Mathew Rosengart, who is now currently working for Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg. From there, gained back personal freedoms like the ability to drive by herself again, and she also proceeded to be more vocal on social media.

But the changing of the legal guard also made major headway concerning the validity of the entire conservatorship. Her father, Jamie Spears, was suspended permanently from his former co-conservator position, after it was alleged by the new counsel that they would be going after him for possibly exhorting his daughter. Just prior to, her dad had actually filed for the conservatorship to end entirely. That ultimately became a reality, and you can see Britney Spears’ video of the fans outside the recent court hearing below:

Framing Britney Spears And Other Documentaries Have Also Shed Light On The Situation

All the major legal developments in the case were first precipitated by several documentaries shedding light on her struggle. The first of which, Framing Britney Spears from the New York Times, presented in February that the Spears family was financially (and therefore unethically) benefiting from the conservatorship. The company followed it up with Controlling Britney Spears in September, which added allegations, such as that the performer's bedroom was bugged by her security team and father. CNN also released a special on the ramifications of the legal battle, while Netflix’s Britney vs Spears suggested that efforts to change the situation were continually thwarted by her father.

Conflicts Within The Spears Family Have Also Resulted From The Conservatorship Battle

The “Oops, I Did It Again” singer is officially free from her conservatorship, but it clearly still had an effect on her familial relationships and likely won't go away anytime soon. On her social media, Britney Spears had previously slammed her family for leaving her “drowning” in the legal situation. Later, her accusations got more pointed, starting first with her sister, Jamie Lynn, and then her mother, the latter of whom she claimed had more of an orchestrating hand in the conservatorship than was previously believed. Lynne Spears has since requested money for legal bills from the conservatorship, which she seemingly won’t be getting now.

What a difference a year makes, eh? Britney Spears will likely be celebrating for a little now and can hopefully move on, in whatever way she feels best.

Lauren Vanderveen

Freelance writer. Favs: film history, reality TV, astronomy, French fries.