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The Price Is Right Host Drew Carey Shares Bold Prediction For Show's Future After Award Win

Drew Carey Plinko game 50th anniversary special screenshot
(Image credit: CBS)

There are some game shows that just stand the test of time. Wheel of Fortune has caused people to yell at their TV screens (and contestants for their terrible guesses) since 1975, while general trivia knowledge has never been more exciting than on Jeopardy!, which has graced the airwaves since 1964. And in between those years, The Price Is Right took the mundane knowledge of retail prices and turned it into an exciting decades-long phenomenon. So how much longer will it be before the Big Wheel spins off into the sunset? As far as host Drew Carey is concerned, he doesn’t think it’ll be anytime soon.

The version of The Price Is Right that we know today premiered in 1972 and has been a CBS staple for the last 50 years, but even before that, a version of the game aired from 1956 to 1965. While accepting an award at the NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) Show, Drew Carey discussed the series' future, and he predicted the game show will have a longer shelf life than just about anything on the show that contestants are asked to guess the price of. He said, per Deadline

[The show] could be around for 100 years on American television, because it’s just that strong. . . . [It] has been able to adapt with the times and change and grow. It’s humbling to be part of this legacy.

The host’s bold prediction actually makes sense. The Price Is Right might just be around for another century, because price-guessing is such a deceptively simple  — and kind of ingenious — concept. While the players’ job boils down to playing games to determine the value of everyday items, such as kitchen appliances, furniture sets, or A NEW CAR!, it’s the boisterous atmosphere that attracts and keeps its audience. Not to mention vicarious living through the contestants.

The flashing lights, loud music and screaming audience members make for some pretty exciting TV viewing --- take, for example, the man who broke the Plinko record. That characteristic sets it apart from other long-running game shows that feature less frantic interactions and more structured formats. Can you imagine if Wheel of Fortune’s audience was encouraged to try to help the contestants on stage? Or Jeopardy! contestants were introduced while they ran, hollering and jumping, onto the stage?

While it’s probably not required for longevity, having moments that go viral online certainly doesn’t hurt a show, and the players’ enthusiasm has resulted in plenty of rewatchable moments. Just recently a contestant found herself in a painfully relatable situation when she couldn’t figure out how to get off-stage. While that was certainly embarrassing, it was much less dramatic than the man who fell flat on his face after losing at the Big Wheel. Who wouldn't watch more of that for another 50 years, presumably while home sick from school or work?

Drew Carey has been bringing that big wheel energy to The Price Is Right since 2007, and he said he’s humble to be a part of such an institution. He got the job when the iconic Bob Barker retired after hosting the show for the previous 35 years. In 2019, Carey has even led the game show into primetime with The Price Is Right at Night, where in addition to the typical gameplay, a celebrity is often featured playing for charity. 

The Price Is Right, which continues to unintentionally fool people into thinking SNL vet Adam Sandler is on the production team, is certainly not going anywhere anytime soon, regardless of whether or not it survives into the 22nd century. The show airs weekdays in syndication, so check your local listings to see when and where it’s playing in your area. In the meantime, be sure to hit up our 2022 TV premiere schedule to see all the new and returning shows popping up on the small screen soon.

Heidi Venable
Heidi Venable

Mom of two and hard-core '90s kid. Unprovoked, will quote Friends in any situation. Can usually be found rewatching The West Wing instead of doing anything productive.