3 Big Ways The Yellowstone Universe Will Likely Continue To Expand After Season 5

Rip in sunglasses and hat on a horse on Yellowstone
(Image credit: Paramount Network)

The world of Yellowstone has certainly exploded wide open since the last time viewers caught up with John Dutton and the rest of the ranch-based crew in Paradise Valley. From the tragic denouement of 1883’s origin story to the fifth season getting super-sized to the Bass Reeves connections and beyond, Taylor Sheridan has continued to expand the neo-western’s storytelling sandbox, and a new update suggests we’ll be seeing even more from the Duttons’ history than expected, with three plans for expansion that should get fans pumped. 

1923 Now Being Planned For A Two-Season Run

While the 1923 offshoot was initially set to be a limited series in the same capacity as 1883, it appears those plans have changed, and all parties involved are eager to bring even more to the table with Harrison Ford and Helen Mirren's Jacob and Cara Dutton and the rest of the fam. According to Deadline, Sheridan put in the request to turn 1923 into a two-season project, with eight episodes apiece. And perhaps unsurprisingly, it's reported that no one balked at the idea, with 101 Studios and MTV Entertainment Studios apparently agreeing to the extended prequel plans. 

As far as where things are currently at in that process, it's stated that negotiations are now in the works to make sure the sprawling cast is signed on for the additional season. None of the cast members are noted specifically, which will probably remain the case for as long as possible, since this is quite a deadly franchise. Given that it's Harrison Ford's first major TV show, it was already surprising to considering him potentially sticking it out for one full season, so I'm very intrigued to see what his schedule looks like going forward. 

Two More Prequel Spinoffs Are Being Discussed

If it ain’t broke, find ways to bring as many versions of it to life as possible. Not the most common adage, but seemingly one that Taylor Sheridan adheres to. Because it’s reported that following 1923, which was initially announced as being set in 1932, the Yellowstone co-creator is putting some major thought into not just one, but two additional standalone limited series to further bridge the familial gap from 1883’s cross-country journey to current iteration of the Duttons that Yellowstone fans have become obsessed with since its debut on Paramount Network.

Specifically, Sheridan is considering the idea for one prequel to take place in the 1940s, and for the second to be set in the 1960s. Whether he’d choose to stick with the 20-year gaps between each — leading to the theoretical 1943 and 1963 — is anyone’s guess. But I know I wouldn’t be the only fan who’d be upset if he cut things off there and didn’t eventually deliver a spinoff set in the 1980s. I just want someone from the Dutton clan to have dressed like Jon Bon Jovi at some point.

The lineup of upcoming Yellowstone shows continues to grow, even though it doesn’t seem like Taylor Sheridan has cloned himself or any other magical tactics to allow for this many shows to be on his docket. It’s not like he’s just handling all things Yellowstone, with Sylvester Stallone’s Tulsa King premiering alongside the Duttons’ fifth season, and a heap of other unrelated dramas with big names attached. We’ll have to wait and see if Paramount+ officially announces any of the above plans, but I doubt we’ll be waiting very long.

Yellowstone Season 5 will kick off on Paramount Network on Sunday, November 13, at 9:00 p.m. ET, with a special two-hour event premiere, with 1923 set to debut in December on Paramount+. Head to our 2022 TV premiere schedule to see what new and returning shows are popping up soon. 

Nick Venable
Assistant Managing Editor

Nick is a Cajun Country native, and is often asked why he doesn't sound like that's the case. His love for his wife and daughters is almost equaled by his love of gasp-for-breath laughter and gasp-for-breath horror. A lifetime spent in the vicinity of a television screen led to his current dream job, as well as his knowledge of too many TV themes and ad jingles.