When it comes to open-world games there's an expectation of gameplay and immersion that gamers have when going into the title. For instance, gamers look for a certain scale to be present, a number of biomes to make an appearance, and a certain level of interactivity to rear its head when it comes to chatting with the native NPCs and exploring some of the lore-rich locations within a fictional universe. The 2011 open-world shooter from id Software, RAGE, failed to deliver on those expectations. Id Software learned its lesson from what it did wrong with the id Tech 5-powered game engine and decided to take a different route with RAGE 2, which is being made in collaboration with Avalanche Studios. This time around, the developers are promising a much more open-world with RAGE 2.

Speaking with Gamespot at this year's QuakeCon in Texas, studio director Tim Willits explained that the team is working on rectifying what they failed to accomplish with the first RAGE, saying...

Don't try to make an open-world game with the technology that's not open world. [laughs] That one. But, people love to experience emergent gameplay, and that's signature Avalanche style. Rage really was too directed, it was too, "go here, now do this." There's much more freedom of choice, freedom of your ability to play the way you want, and it's actually more approachable. And yes, I know that what you played seemed very id style, and it kind of forced you in this building, but when you get the real game, you get there, you can knock out all the guys upfront, drop mortars, shoot them from a distance. You can go halfway in, and come back and finish it later. You can do that. You have a lot more choice and opportunity than in the previous game.

This was partly demonstrated in the E3 videos that were released during Bethesda's stage presentation, where we saw that the combat environments in RAGE 2 are now seamlessly attached to the traversal environments. This means that players have more options and freedom in how they approach a level and attack a certain objective.

This also means you no longer have to deal with the linear-style corridor dungeons that were present in the first RAGE that kind of limited the way players could attack certain quests or deal with enemies. Basically, it was setup where you had your traversal segments, you went to a level and then you went into a separate instance for the dungeons, creating this disjointed feeling between the gameplay, especially when compared to seamlessly open-world games like Bethesda's own The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim.

A lot of people complained about RAGE because they felt like it should have been what RAGE 2 is, only, at the time, RAGE 2 wasn't a thing.

However, this time around the team is working with Avalanche Studios and the Apex Engine that was used to power the newer Just Cause games, enabling the teams to make full use of transitional outdoor and indoor environments, as well as engage in full three-dimensional combat using vehicles, the terrain, and the air as a way to engage with foes.

We'll see if gamers are as excited about playing RAGE 2 as the developers have been when it comes to presenting it to the gaming community. You can look for the post-apocalyptic first-person shooter to launch on on home consoles and PC next June.

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