13 New Netflix TV Shows To Look Out For In November 2022

Morticia, Wednesday, Gomez and Pugsley Addams in Netflix's Wednesday
(Image credit: Netflix)

Throughout October, Netflix definitely delivered on content worthy of the spookiest month ever, with hair-raising hits such as Mike Flanagan’s cliffhanger-packing The Midnight Club and Ryan Murphy’s pair of criticism-sparking true crime dramas, Dahmer and The Watcher. But what’s to come after Halloween is over, while we’re digging through leftover mounds of lower quality Trick-or-Treat candy? That’s what we’re here for, to shine a spotlight on a batch of new scripted shows, docuseries, specials, and more debuting throughout November for those with Netflix subscriptions.

So without further delay, let’s take a quick look at 13 upcoming originals joining Netflix’s 2022 schedule that are likely destined for the streaming service’s Top 10 rankings, assuming enough people out there take the binge-ready plunge. And take note that we’ve also culled together a rundown of the biggest shows returning for new seasons, for everyone in need of something familiar in the build-up to Thanksgiving. 

Soccer players in locker room in Netflix's The Final Score

(Image credit: Netflix)

The Final Score - November 2

Soccer has long been tied to a history of violent incidents and illegal activity around the globe, with the deadly stampede in Indonesia in October 2022 marking the latest tragedy. The dramatized miniseries The Final Score will showcase just such a story, though one in which inspiration and positivity shined through. As part of Netflix’s burgeoning push for Colombian content, The Final Score covers the tumultuous rise and fall of Colombian soccer between the years of 1987 and 1994, where the sport’s ties with drug cartels eventually led to the murder of beloved footballer  Andrés Escobar following the 1994 World Cup. (For those who are already interested in this show, it’s also possibly worth checking out the corruption-focused documentary FIFA Uncovered, out on November 9.)

Sally McNeil posing on a tank in Killer Sally

(Image credit: Netflix)

Killer Sally - November 2 

When it comes to true crime docuseries, Netflix is kicking off November with another dark and complicated story from the world of sports and athletics, Killer Sally, with former Marine-turned-bodybuilder Sally McNeil as the titular subject. She spent just under 20 years in prison for shooting her bodybuilder husband Ray McNeil to death on Valentine’s Day in 1995, with Killer Sally featuring interviews with McNeil, family, friends, and legal team members. Helping to make this project extra intriguing is director and producer Nanette Burstein, whose past work includes the acclaimed On the Ropes, The Kid Stays in the Picture and 2020’s Hillary.  

Employees standing at counter in Netflix's Blockbuster

(Image credit: Netflix)

Blockbuster - November 3 

While many may view the death of video rental stores as a tragedy, Netflix’s Blockbuster looks to be anything but, as a good-natured workplace comedy set within the brand’s last store in existence. Created by Brooklyn Nine-Nine and Superstore writer/producer Vanessa Ramos, Blockbuster boasts a nostalgic vibe and a talented ensemble that includes Randall Park (WandaVision), Melissa Fumero (B99), JB Smoove (Curb Your Enthusiasm), Olga Merediz (In the Heights), Tyler Alvarez (American Vandal), Madeleine Arthur (Devil in Ohio), and Kamaia Fairburn (Holly Hobby). Also serving as a writer and executive producer is Happy Endings creator and Black Monday co-creator David Caspe, which can only mean good things. 

Poster for Netflix's Lookism

(Image credit: Netflix)

Lookism - November 4 

The overall explosion of streaming anime projects has led to a rise in popularity in similar fare from other countries, and an animated adaptation of the South Korean manhwa webtoon Lookism will soon join Netflix’s library of content. This tale definitely isn’t for younger viewers, however, as it centers on an obese and bullied high school student, Park Hyung Seok, who inexplicably wakes next to a second version of his body that is slimmer, more muscular, and traditionally more attractive. He uses his new body to learn more about such widespread discrimination as an online influencer and model, opening him up to a new world of gangs, criminal undertakings and would-be rappers.  

Neal Brennan performing stand-up in Neal Brennan: Blocks

(Image credit: Netflix)

Neal Brennan: Blocks - November 8 

One of Netflix’s higher-profile stand-up comedy specials dropping in November is Neal Brennan: Blocks, the latest mind-expanding effort from the Chappelle’s Show co-creator, writer, and director. (I’ll never stop being impressed by Brennan also co-writing Half Baked in the midst of writing for Nickelodeon’s All That.) Brennan last took the televised stage for 2017’s 3 Mics, which is also streaming (opens in new tab) on the service for anyone who needs an hour-long reason why the new special is worth watching as soon as it drops.  

The Teletubbies outside in Netflix's Teletubbies reboot

(Image credit: Netflix)

Teletubbies - November 14 

I’ll admit that the latest Teletubbies reboot made this list partly in jest, since it doesn’t seem to be doing anything interestingly left-field with the fuzzy foursome of Dipsy, Tinky Winky, Laa-Laa and Po, at least beyond adding the great Tituss Burgess as narrator. But let’s not forget how popular the original preschool series’ run was with those far beyond their preschool years, partially due to its subdued and psychedelic qualities, and partially due to behind-the-scenes headlines. And while I can’t imagine the same kinds of headlines will pop up from the Netflix version, I’d expect similar low-level trippiness.

T-Rex threatening characters in Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous

(Image credit: Netflix)

Jurassic World Camp Cretaceous: Hidden Adventure - November 15 

While the critically maimed moneymaker Jurassic World: Dominion has drawn much of the franchise’s dino-driven focus in recent years, Netflix’s Camp Cretaceous animated series winningly expanded its own exciting narrative across five seasons. Fans will get one final adventure with the Camp Fam via the interactive special dubbed Hidden Adventure, which will put viewers in charge of keeping Darius, Yaz and the others safe as they search for food and supplies after a huge storm made resources scarce. Which would be easy enough to do if there weren’t dinosaurs roaming around also in need of satiating their hunger.

Sara Jane Ho in Netflix's Mind Your Manners

(Image credit: Netflix)

Mind Your Manners - November 16 

Netflix’s ever-expanding slate of unscripted series is filled with crime-centered fare and the heightened “reality” of shows like Love Is Blind, but let’s all appreciate the growth of more inspirational and self-reflective shows popularized in part by the past success of Tidying Up with Marie Kondo. The latest of these shows is Mind Your Manners, a cram session in proper etiquette — which still exists outside the dingy crevices of social media — as presented with endless grace by the internationally revered Sara Jane Ho, who founded the highly lauded Institute Sarita finishing schools in China, among many other accolade-earning feats. So I dare say the entire world could do some good watching Mind Your Manners, even if it’s just to learn how not to slurp one’s soup. 

Woman falling in poster for 1899

(Image credit: Netflix)

1899 - November 17 

The creative team behind Netflix’s two-season hit Dark are back to give viewers even more nightmarish visuals, only this time they’re heading back to the tail end of the 19th century with the ocean-set horror mystery 1899. The show follows a group of European migrants heading from London to New York City via steamship, but their journey takes on a terrifying new direction after another migrant ship is discovered at sea, with hints of Bermuda Triangle-esque curiosities abound. Beyond the show’s epic scope, 1899 also boasts a cast that includes Emily Beecham (Into the Badlands), Aneurin Barnard (Dunkirk), Andreas Pietschmann (Dark), Miquel Bernardeau (Elite), and Anton Lesser (Game of Thrones), among many others. 

Man standing behind Som in Netflix's Somebody

(Image credit: Netflix)

Somebody - November 18

One day after presumably bingeing 1899 in its entirety, genre fans will get their first chance to enjoy the South Korean psychological thriller series Somebody, which is Based in part on Mary Harron’s 2000 adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’ novel American Psycho. The upcoming series centers on the tech developer Som (Kang Hae Lim), whose new social media app, titled Somebody, is discovered to have connections to a stream of recent murders, leading her to assist the case’s lead detective, who happens to be her friend, in trying to track down the killer. Also co-starring are Netflix familiars Kim Young Kwang (Hello, Me!) and Kim Yong Ji (The King: Eternal Monarch, Mr. Sunshine).   

Trevor Noah with microphone for comedy special Trevor Noah: I Wish You Would

(Image credit: Netflix)

Trevor Noah: I Wish You Would - November 22 

Trevor Noah is giving Netflix subscribers his third stand-up special for the streaming service with I Wish You Would, which marks his eleventh overall special. The timing of this one is interesting, as Noah filmed it in Toronto in early October, days before going public with the news that he would be stepping down as The Daily Show’s host after seven years behind the desk. (That exit will happen in December.) As such, the new material appears to be a bit less political and intense as the topics he covers on a daily (show) basis, perhaps as a sign of what’s to come next in his career.  

Anne Boleyn in Netflix's Blood, Sex and Royalty

(Image credit: Netflix)

Blood, Sex And Royalty - November 23 

For Netflix audiences who wish The Crown was sexier and that Bridgerton was more driven by historical accuracy, look no further than the three episodes cromprising Blood, Sex and Royalty. Starring Amy James-Kelly (Coronation Street) and Max Parker (Emmerdale) as Anne Boleyn and Henry VIII, respectively, the new show will center on their early relationship, with Boleyn shaking up the era’s sexual purity with her feminist and radical stances, despite being expected to fall into the traditional role of child-bearing matriarch. As its name no doubt suggests, Blood, Sex and Royalty is being touted as a “modern take on the British royal drama,” which indicates much female-centric pleasures abound.  

Wednesday Addams holding bags of goldfish in Netflix's Wednesday

(Image credit: Netflix)

Wednesday - November 23 

2022 has finally delivered the long-hoped-for pairing of macabre mastermind Tim Burton and a live-action Addams Family universe, in the form of the horror-comedy murder-mystery Wednesday. Starring Jenna Ortega as the spooky clan’s titular daughter, this iteration will be quite unlike everything fans have seen before outside of the comics — starting with the Addams’ Latino heritage — and takes place at a boarding school run by The Sandman’s Gwendoline Christie. There’s nothing not to be excited about here, especially with co-stars such as Jamie McShane and Riki Lindhome, with Luis Guzmán, Catherine Zeta Jones and Fred Armisen respectively guest-starring as Gomez, Morticia and Uncle Fester. Not to mention the ‘90s films’ Wednesday portrayer herself, Christina Ricci, who joined the series following Thora Birch’s sudden departure.

Shows Returning For New Seasons In November 2022

  • Young Royals Season 2 - November 1
  • Manifest Season 4 - November 4
  • The Crown Season 5 - November 9
  • Warrior Nun Season 2 - November 10
  • Down to Earth with Zac Efron Season 2 - November 11
  • Deon Cole: Charleen’s Boy - November 15
  • Dead to Me Season 3 - November 17
  • The Cuphead Show! Part 3 - November 18
  • Elite Season 6 - November 18
  • Blood and Water Season 3 - November 25
  • Crime Scene Season 3: The Texas Killing Fields - November 29

That should be more than enough to keep everyone going throughout the month, though Netflix will no doubt offer a few surprise releases as the weeks go by. While waiting to see if that happens, head to our 2022 TV premiere schedule to see what’ll be popping up outside of the streaming service.