Due out this December, Primordia from Wadjet Eye Games and Wormwood Studios has already proven that it seems to have what it takes to rekindle the old-school flavor of point and click games from that bygone era known as the Golden Age of gaming. After spending a little time with the preview build, it was obvious that this game is extremely niche and will appeal strictly to the old-school gamer who appreciates wasteland cyberpunk adventures.

The art-style and design looks like it comes right out of 1994 alongside Revolution Software's undeniably iconic adventure title Beneath a Steel Sky. Gamers who have a strong sense of resonating nostalgia from that little gem will find themselves right at home with Wormwood's Primordia, which takes a more post-apocalyptic approach to its cyberpunk affair.

Players take control of a robot named Horatio (no relation to the one from CSI: Miami) as he and his snide sidekick, Crispin, traverse the dusty sands of a desolate and cybernetic infused wasteland. The harsh atmosphere is made worse off thanks to a bullying robot usurping power supplies, making Horatio and his sidekick a target for his misdeeds. The game doesn't waste time getting to the point but at the same time leaves players with tons of questions that are explored through actual gameplay.

After the big bully robot damages Horatio and his ship, players are thrust into the terrifying situation of having to brave the wasteland, find a power source, recharge Horatio and his sidekick while also discovering the philosophy of robot independence, the god-man complex and a little bit of cyber-fantasy to keep things interesting.

I don't want to give anything away before you actually play the game, but I can say that first and foremost the art-style is an archaic mix of hand-painted scenarios and digitized drawings, truly encompassing the visual flavors and aesthetics that helped defined the era of the point-and-click adventure titles of the mid 1990s.



What's more, is that this game isn't just about dabbling into the cybermacy of old-school point and click games, it actually encompasses a solid grasp of the wasteland cyberpunk depictions from movies like Crash and Burn (also known as Hardware), The Blood of Heroes and a cyberjunkie take on the artwork of H.R. Geiger. It's the sort of thing that die-hard cyberpunk fans will instantly fall in love with, but something new-school gamers may or may not like depending on their willingness to accept a game that doesn't look like it was assimilated with a Michael Bay film filter.

But let's talk a little bit about the game (while also not giving anything important away). The one thing you can take away from the experience, other than the truly inspired artwork and graphic designs – and am I the only one who loves those old beat-up, Tandy TRS-style computer designs used in cyberpunk films even though they're supposed to be futuristic? Just me? Okay, moving on – is that the game is challenging, frustrating and difficult without being impossible.

You won't find yourself having to reload the game because you screwed up and put the transistor connector inside the flux capacitor instead of putting it inside the modular photon drive. In other words, it's thought-provoking without being hand-holding and it's difficult without being King's Quest 6-hard. In new-school gaming talk: you'll be able to have fun without having to restart because you screwed up once. Depending on how die-hard a point-and-click fan you are will determine whether you like that style of play.

So far, the game looks great for the kind of genre it's presenting and so long as the actual game has enough longevity it could be a real treat for adventure fans. The voice acting is especially good for a low-budget title and it's easy to get attached to Horatio and his sidekick Crispin.

The game is currently looking to get certified on Steam and is aimed to release this December on PC. You can learn more by visiting the Official Website.

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