At the heart of the new God of War is a story about a father and his son, which is why James Barlog was probably the perfect guy to tackle the game's official novelization. In case that name isn't ringing any bells, he's the father of Cory Barlog, the director of God of War.

God of War Director Cory Barlog took to Twitter recently expressing some rather adorable praise for his "pops," James "JM" Barlog. The tweet included a link to a Santa Monica Studio post about the upcoming God of War novelization, which was written by Daddy Barlog.

James' own social media profile has him pegged as an award-winning author of genres including horror, adventure and suspense, as well as various young adult novels. While we're admittedly not familiar with his previous work, he looks to have quite a few novels to his credit.

As far as the novelization is concerned, the description listed on Titan Books' website seems to be pulled from the game's description, rather than offering any fresh details. Still, if you've played the game, you've probably got a pretty good idea of what the novel is going to be about. If you haven't played the game, then plowing through this 352-page paperback will probably take less time, even though you'll be missing out on hours upon hours of hacking and slashing your way through Norse gods and monsters.

Since one of the key things God of War has been praised for is its narrative, we imagine that will provide a strong skeleton for a book aimed at fleshing out the details and diving deeper into the story. Again, without all of that rage-fueled monster murder going on, we imagine James will have the opportunity to explore the father/son relationship of Kratos and Atreus even more.

Still, part of me is kind of hoping that James Barlog will be unable to keep his personal experiences out of the novel, considering the fact that he's the father of the game's director. I'd love a few passive aggressive passages like, "Atreus, for the first time, defied his father. Kratos could not help but suspect this would be the first of many such betrayals, perhaps leading to a lifetime of shirked chores, disrespect and disappointments. He had little trouble imagining Atreus going on to become a successful craftsman, beloved the world over for his work. But would he write to his father? Would he remember to send birthday cards? No. No, he would not."

For those of you looking to pick up the novelization of God of War, even if it's lacking such amazing passages as the one suggested above, it will be available in the UK and US on Aug. 28. A price point has not yet been listed.

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