Locker room interviews that take place after professional sports competitions are pretty standard now, and have been for, what must be, decades. Usually, these interviews are just not that much of a big deal. Whatever player is being interviewed talks about how well the team did, or how they failed miserably and why. Then everyone goes about their day either with happy thoughts of their favorite team, or hoping that the guys do better next time. Well, the NFL Network interview that took place in the Bengals’ locker room after their win against Buffalo was a bit more eventful than that. This video is totally NSFW, so consider yourself warned.



The video, which appeared on Screengrabber, shows that the post-game interview by network reporter Albert Breer was filled with butts and dongles for all the world to see. Actually, when you think about it, it’s surprising that more made for television locker room conversations don’t end up as NSFW accounts of a team’s success or failure.

What I like mostly about the video (and I will not cop to this being the obvious answer) is that there’s at least one player in the background who is very carful not to reveal all his natural born talents to the world. Right in the center of the screen you can see him wrap a towel around his waist, and then remove his underwear. Sure, he adjusts the towel at one point and gives us a basically imperceptible peek, but he appears to be rather modest compared to his compatriots.

When you think about it, if you consider men in a locker room (and I’m sure some of you have) doesn’t it seem like they’d be more willing than women to show off their all-togethers? Especially when we talk about strong men who work really hard at being fine physical specimens because their jobs basically depend on it?

Also, I get the impression that men, they just don’t care. They seem less likely to be filled with the kind of insecurity that ladies are about their bodies in general and their nethers in particular. I’m sure there can be some…comparison there, but the idea that you care what others thing might be more embarrassing than just letting it all hang out.

The tradition of locker room interviews must go back at least to the 1970s, when, I’m sure, reporters and athletes were a lot more careful about the interview’s surroundings. But now, aren't more people OK with everyone else being naked? Of course, that doesn’t mean that men and women looking for a little simple and honest analysis of the game want to see booties and bits everywhere. Which doesn’t mean that some of you aren’t glad this happened. I guess it’s true what they say, someone somewhere is game for anything.

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